Does Not Compute: An Exhibition from Tyler Bohm

2/7/20 - 3/14/20

Recurring daily

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934 Gallery

934 Cleveland Ave., Columbus, OH 43201

(614) 725-1130

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Details

934 Gallery presents Does Not Compute: An Exhibition from Tyler Bohm

Opening Reception - Friday, February 7, 7 – 10 pm

Artist Talk and Closing Reception - Saturday, March 14, Doors - 12 pm; Talk - 1 pm 

Gallery Hours - Every Saturday 12 - 3 pm

Beer Provided by Seventh Son Brewing

 

About Tyler Bohm

Tyler Bohm is a new media artist who has spent several years working in the architectural industry, where he adopted the tools and techniques of digital and physical modeling to create digitally-inspired sculptural, video, and hybrid works. The resulting process, which involves traditional approaches such as painting mediated through a range of design technologies, is reflective of the technological themes explored in the work. In recent years, he has participated in exhibitions at NURTUREart (Brooklyn), Cue Art Foundation (New York), Equity Gallery (New York), Boston Cyberarts Gallery, Terrault Contemporary (Baltimore), Icebox Project Space (Philadelphia), Trestle Gallery (Brooklyn), Weston Art Gallery (Cincinnati), Gallery Madison Park (New York), Proto Gallery (Hoboken, NJ), Plexus Projects (Brooklyn) and Ann Street Gallery (Newburgh, NY). His work has been covered in Two Coats of Paint, SciArt Magazine, E-Squared and Peripheral Vision Arts. He is a graduate of Kenyon College and Oxford University and currently lives in Columbus, Ohio.

 

Artist Statement

The technologies that shape our lives represent an intriguing platform for speculation. They evoke an array of hypothetical futures drawn from both the dystopian and utopian ends of science fiction. I explore this evolving technological landscape by imagining futurist scenarios that reflect broader hopes and fears about the present.


My work probes the effects of contemporary technologies on how we view ourselves and the world around us, exploring the nature of perception in the digital age. It explores themes such as technophilia and technophobia, evolving online cultures and norms, and the warped sense of normalcy that arises in the face of rapid technological change. 


These thematic interests dovetail with my process. I am interested in navigating the fuzzy gray area between the digital and physical, and often use CAD software and laser cutting to translate digital designs into physical objects, and to embed video within hybrid media works.